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NMVVRC Team in the News

South Carolina Public Radio

Helping Teens Cope after National Tragedy

This week Bobbi Conner talks with Dr. Rochelle Hanson about helping teens cope in the aftermath of national tragedy. Dr. Hanson is a Professor in the Departments of Psychiatry and Pediatrics, and she is the Director of the Family and Child Program at the National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center at MUSC.

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Index Journal

Oakland to Parkland: We have to fix this

In October, the Medical University of South Carolina’s National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center received an $18 million federal grant to set up the country’s first Mass Violence and Victimization Resource Center. The facility will be led by Dean Kilpatrick. His team will be responsible for developing a way to bring fast and comprehensive services to help those affected by a mass casualty event.

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MUSC Catalyst News

MUSC experts working on Mass Violence Center discuss lastest school shooting

There may not be an agreed-upon plan to prevent mass shootings, but there is an effort to make sure people affected by such violence get the best treatment possible. That’s where the MUSC-based center, funded by an $18 million grant from the federal Office for Victims of Crime, will come in.

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WMBF News

Mass violence impacts to be studied at new MUSC center

When the unimaginable happens, one South Carolina school is leading the way to help victims of mass violence... A team of people at the Medical University of South Carolina is spearheading efforts to change the way our nation responds to these kinds of events.

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South Carolina Public Radio

Mass Violence Victimization & Resource Center

This week Bobbi Conner talks with Dr. Dean Kilpatrick about the new Mass Violence and Victimization Resource Center, which is being created to provide services and resources for people affected by mass violence. Dr. Kilpatrick is the Director of the National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center at MUSC.

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MUSC Catalyst News

Government calls on MUSC to address mass violence 

With multiple mass casualty events in 2017 showing an increase in frequency, a team at MUSC’s National Crime Victims Research & Treatment Center have their hands full in the development of a Mass Violence and Victimization Resource Center funded by an $18 million grant it received from the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC).

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Charleston City Paper

$18 million DOJ grant puts MUSC at the forefront of mass violence research in America

The new Mass Violence and Victimization Resource Center, which will be funded by the DOJ grant, will collect information on mass violence incidents in the past. Input from victims, families, law enforcement, and first responders will help broaden the scope of what has worked for them and what can be recommended to state and local authorities.

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News 2

$18 million grant will help MUSC assist people affected by mass violence

The Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston is opening the nation's first Mass Violence and Victimization Resource Center.The center is being funded by an $18 million grant it received from the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) to help survivors of these horrific events nationwide.

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Post and Courier

South Carolina team wins $18M federal grant to help victims of mass violence

MUSC’s National Crime Victims Research & Treatment Center recently won an $18 million federal grant through the Department of Justice to establish the first Mass Violence and Victimization Resource Center. It is, by far, the largest grant the center has received in its 40-year history.

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Live 5 News

MUSC introduces new Mass Violence Center

A new Mass Violence and Victimization Center is setting up here in Charleston, the only facility of it's kind in the state. The new program at Medical Science University will will be used to help people across the country deal with violent tragedies.

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MUSC Catalyst News

Where can you feel safe?

With the news still fresh about a Texas church shooting that killed 4 percent of the town’s population and left 26 people dead, Dean Kilpatrick and his team at the National Crime Victims Research & Treatment Center are rolling up their sleeves.

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MUSC Catalyst News

When the "unimaginable" happens

His team will be responsible for developing a way to bring fast and comprehensive services to help those affected by a mass casualty event. 'Our job is not to figure out who is doing this but to figure out how to help those affected by it — the survivors, victims’ families and first responders. We need to be able to respond quickly. This is about trying to really help the nation do a better job when these things happen.'

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